Thursday, July 22, 2021 | 5:30 PM CT / 6:30 PM EST
Session Recording >

 

About the Keynote Session:

This event will feature co-authors and researchers Dr. Jeremy Hoffman and Dr. Vivek Shandas who, along with Nicholas Pendleton, recently won acclaim for their study, “The Effects of Historical Housing Policies on Resident Exposure to Intra-Urban Heat: A Study of 108 US Urban Areas.” Their study, published in the January 2020 special issue of Climate, “Survivability under Overheating – The Impact of Regional and Global Climate Change on Vulnerable and Low Income Populations,” was featured in the New York Times in August 2020 as part of its Climate and Environment Series and identifies growing evidence that policy, racism, and climate change contribute directly quality of life disparities that disproportionately impact low-income communities of color.

Panelists:

Dr. Jeremy Hoffman is the Chief Scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and Affiliate Faculty in the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs and the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Hoffman specializes in connecting diverse audiences to their changing planet through community science campaigns, interactive media, dynamic exhibitions, and hands-on experiences.

Dr. Vivek Shandas is a Professor of Climate Adaptation and Director of the Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab at Portland State University. Professor Shandas supports public, private, and non-profit organizations in identifying and evaluating adaptations to climate-induced stressors, including extreme events such as urban heat, air quality, and storms. He has published over 100 articles, three books, and his research has been featured in the NYTimes, National Geographic, Scientific American, and dozens of other national and local media. Dr.Shandas serves as Chair of the City of Portland’s Urban Forestry Commission and serves on several local and national advisory boards. During his spare time, he revels in the mountains and waters of the Pacific Northwest, and pines for late-night tacos anywhere he can find them.

 

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